When car lovers are taking their vehicles out of the garage less than ever, it’s the best time to take car passions to the big screen. We reached out to our own SweetCars team, as well as area experts Michelle DeVinney, Whatzup movie columnist, and Derek Devine, Cinema Center executive director, to put together a list of cars that steal every scene in their favorite blockbuster hits. Here’s our top 10 most memorable movie cars that we can’t stop talking about (even decades later)—in no particular order!

Contributors:

Derek Devine | Cinema Center, Executive Director, Michele DeVinney | Whatzup, Movie Columnist, Colt Gonzalez | Sweet Family of Companies, Social Media Coordinator, Sheri Calhoun | SweetCars, Concierge, Don Banowetz | All Pro Integrated Systems, President

  1. Messerschmitt KR200 – Brazil (Derek)

It was a 3-wheeled, 2-cycle, 1-cylinder “Kabinenroller” that doubled as a souped-up, post-apocalyptic semi — I believe in some ways it foreshadowed the giant International XT pickup truck.

  1. 1970 Dodge Charger R/T – The Fast and the Furious series (Colt)

It wasn’t the first time the Charger appeared in Hollywood, but it definitely left its mark in the car community. I dreamed of one day owning a Charger and feeling the raw power and aggressive stance of this iconic vehicle. [Spoiler] When the car was destroyed in the end, it surely brought tears to any gearhead’s eyes.

  1. 1973 Ford Falcon XB GT Coupe 1973, “V8 Interceptor” – The Mad Max series (Derek)

The modified Ford Falcon became an iconic car and Max Rockatansky’s go-to throughout the series — plus it gave Australian fans a vehicle for their very own. Actually, the dog is my favorite part of the film (the cars are pretty cool though).

  1. 1973 Ford Mustang GT500 – Gone in 60 Seconds (Sheri)

I loved the movie Gone in 60 Seconds with Nicolas Cage. He’s a retired car thief who comes out of retirement to save his brother’s life. He and his team have to steal 50 cars. It’s a thriller! His “baby” is Eleanor, a 1973 Ford Mustang GT500 and it’s beautiful. It’s a classic muscle car. Nicolas Cage isn’t so bad either!

  1. 1967 Volkswagen Type 2 (T1) Station Wagon – Fast Times at Ridgemont High (Derek)

I love the vintage VW van and I’ve always wanted to own one (but I also like to arrive at my destination).

  1. 1977 Pontiac Trans Am – Smokey & the Bandit (Don & Michael)

The 1977 Pontiac Trans Am’s iconic status was cemented in the movie Smokey & the Bandit when Burt Reynolds and Sally Field raced across America on a frivolous and near impossible mission. I purchased a Trans Am and completed a 2-year restoration bringing it back to its glory days of the late ‘70s. It takes me back to my freshman year of college — a much simpler time. (Dan)

I grew up around Pontiacs and my dad owned several Trans Ams — it was cool to see one in a famous movie. We went to a ton of Trans Am national car shows, and Smokey & the Bandit cars were always popular. Everyone knows the Smokey & the Bandit Trans Am! (Michael)

  1. White Speed Racer Mach 5 – Speed Racer (Derek)

My favorite childhood cartoon was adapted into a visually hilarious motion picture with tons of animated special effects. Plus, my favorite actress made an appearance — Susan Sarandon.

  1. 1948 Ford De Luxe Convertible – Grease (Michele)

I love the car scenes in Grease so much. But first of all, Alice Ghostley as the shop teacher? All the tough guys completely accept the expertise of a female mechanic. Inspiring! I was 16 when the film hit theaters and loved the “Greased Lightning” number and the race scene — they’re both so iconic! We took our vacation in Los Angeles last summer and visited the location where they filmed the race scene. It’s almost embarrassing to admit, but seeing the location almost made me cry! Now I know, Greased Lightning is really a white 1948 Ford De Luxe Convertible.

  1. 1966 Ford GT40 Mark II and 1966 Ferrari 330 P3 – Ford v Ferrari (Derek)

A great story with amazing cinematography, Ford v Ferrari did an excellent job putting me inside fast-moving vehicles. The cars are iconic, and the story is legendary. Plus, I love old race cars.

  1. Every single car in Rush – Rush (Derek)

It’s a Ron Howard masterpiece with great cinematography and a compelling story. The vintage-lens look complements the unbelievable showing of vintage cars that car-fanatics can really get behind.